Spring 2021 Year of Learning Continued…

Please be sure to check out the amazing opportunities that NARACES is offering this semester. If you are interested, please click HERE

Election Results

Dear NARACES members,
Thank you for taking the time to vote for our new leaders who will represent our NARACES region. Before we congratulate the newly elected members, I would like to again thank each of you who ran for the open positions. Please join me in congratulating the newly elected members to the NARACES board:


NARACES President Elect-Elect: Dr. Sherritta Hughes (Georgian Court University) 

NARACES Secretary Elect-Elect: Dr. Candice Crawford (Molloy College)

NARACES Graduate Student Representative: Carolyn Bazan (Rutgers University)

2020 Award and Grant Winners

Please see the video below for this year’s award and grant winners! Congratulations to all! 😀

CACREP 2023 Standards Revision Webinar

The CACREP 2023 Standards Revision Committee (SRC) will share its process for meeting its charge and provide a status update of its work. SRC members will engage in dialogue and invite participants to share their research on requisite knowledge and skills for entry-level counselors in
all of the specialty areas and at the doctoral level with the specific purpose of informing standards revision.

CACREP staff will also be on hand to provide CACREP updates. Please see the attachment for more details!

Racism: A call to Read, View, and Do

As NARACES leaders, we discussed how we would like to respond to the on-going racism present in our society, and specifically directed towards African Americans. With the recent murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, we believe it is very important to send out our own call to action as many of our professional counseling organizations (i.e., ACA, ACES, NBCC) have already done. Though we echo their sentiments, we wanted to take a slightly different approach by offering action items and invite you to: Read, View, and Do.

As counselors and counselor educators, we know about the stages of change. We also know how imperative it is to be advocates and allies, and to teach our students to be oriented toward social justice, and to model our own social justice commitment to our students. We realize that we are not all in the same place of action and responsiveness toward these racist events, and we ask you to think about where you are in relation to racism and your racial development. From there, decide where you need to be and what you can do to show that you will not stand for racism.

Below is a collection of resources for each category of Read, View, and Do. We urge you to ask yourself, particularly if you are White, ‘How am I being an ally?’ Only you know the answer, and we have provided a place to start, as well as suggestions on how you can begin doing something to take a stand against racism and show solidarity to the Black community. Engaging in these actions can be more powerful, and effect greater change, if you have a community in which to do so; please invite in family, friends, colleagues, and/or neighbors to also read, view, or do. Together, we can create positive change. James Baldwin once wrote “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” As a community, we cannot resolve the nation’s problems alone, but we can at least face our own issues that are relevant to the present situation.

A Call to Read

New Era of Public Safety

JMCD special edition on counseling African American clients in the era of Black Lives Matter, police brutality, and media stereotypes

American Psychiatric Association. (2017). APA Toolkit for Providers Treating African-Americans: Stress and Trauma Related to the Political and Social Environment.

Aymer, S. R. (2016). “I can’t breathe”: A case study – helping Black men cope with race-related trauma stemming from police killing and brutality. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26,(3-4), 367-376.

DiAngelo, R. (2018). White fragility: Why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism. Beacon Press.

Gase, L. N., Glenn, B. A., Gomez, L. M., Kuo, T., Inkelas, M., & Ponce, N. A. (2016). Understanding racial and ethnic disparities in arrest: The role of individual, home, school, and community characteristics. Race and Social Problems, 8(4), 296-312.

Kahn K. B., Steele J. S., McMahon J. M., & Stewart, G. (2017). How suspect race affects police use of force in an interaction over time. Law and Human Behavior, 41(2), 117-126.

Rothstein, R. (2017). The color of law. W.W. Norton & Co.

Saleh, A. Z., Appelbaum, P., Liu, X., Stroup, T. S., & Wall, M. (2018). Deaths of people with mental illness during Interactions with law enforcement. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 58, 110-116.

The Guardian: The Counted Project. January 8, 2017. Young Black Men Again Faced Highest Rate of US Police Killings in 2016.

APA Statement

A Call to View

A Conversation with Obama: Anguish and Action

Yusef Salaam: The Marshall Project

PAMCD webinar: Exploring Barriers and Themes Linked to Racial Distress in The Counseling Relationship

Rachel Cargle Public Address

A Call to Do

Color of Change

Week of Action

Facing History: Educator Resources

USA Today: Take Action Against Racism

NASP Call to Action

Me and White Supremacy

Online Teaching Resources

As we embrace the dawning of a new era, NARACES wanted to provide everyone with supportive resources. We hope everyone stays healthy and safe during this time.